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Last updated: Oct 21, 2020 at 17:26  (HK time)

CORONAVIRUS(COVID-19)TRAVEL UPDATES

There has been significant media coverage of the Coronavirus(COVID-19) situation. As this is an ongoing concern, we have summarized hereunder with the key information related to the Coronavirus(COVID-19)  outbreak for your easier reference.

Please note that the below information may change in very short notice. The information provided here is a guideline and for reference only. Passengers should check their personal circumstances with the information published by the Government of their destination country before travelling.

(1) GOVERNMENT ADVISORIES / TRAVEL BAN

Several countries / regions have issued various levels of travel advisories, as well as some measures, for their citizens travelling to China, including the below: 

Australia:

South Australia will further ease border restrictions with Victoria from 0001 Oct. 24. Officials will allow South Australian residents and people relocating permanently to enter the state, though permission is still required. Authorities will also permit residents in communities within 70 km (44 miles) of the state border to enter South Australia for any reason without quarantine. Most Victoria residents and people with recent travel history in Victoria remain barred from entry, except for essential travel. Despite the eased border controls, approved arrivals from Victoria must still undergo 14-day quarantine periods and take COVID-19 tests no more than seven days prior to arrival in South Australia. Ground transport between Victoria and South Australia remains restricted to specific highways. Staffed checkpoints on approved roads and at Adelaide Airport (ADL) will screen inbound passengers. Travelers to South Australia from all parts of Australia must complete a Cross Border Travel Registration before arrival.

The New South Wales (NSW) government has further eased restrictions along the Victoria border. Officials are allowing people transiting Victoria, including ground travelers from South Australia, to enter New South Wales, provided they strictly transit the state and apply for a new transit permit. Residents of border communities in Victoria can travel within the established 50-km (31-mile) border region for any reason. NSW residents entering Victoria must stay within the border region or face quarantine. NSW residents returning from Victoria can enter the state with an entry permit but must self-isolate upon return or provide official documentation of a completed 14-day quarantine in Victoria. Travelers from other states transiting Victoria on direct routes to New South Wales are also exempt from quarantine requirements. Hundreds of security personnel are present at the border and monitoring the area with surveillance equipment. Travelers violating the orders could receive fines of up to AUD 11,000 (USD 7,660) and face up to six months in jail.

Most travelers entering Australia must quarantine in government-designated facilities for 14 days in the city of arrival. New Zealand residents can enter New South Wales without quarantine. The New South Wales government charges all travelers required to quarantine to pay at the end of the period. Quarantine fees are AUD 3,000 (USD 2,130) for the first adult, AUD 1,000 (USD 710) per additional adult, and AUD 355 per child; the government does not charge fees for children under three years old. Travelers who purchased tickets with a confirmed arrival date before 2359 July 12 are exempt from payment. Authorities require quarantined travelers to take a COVID-19 test on the 10th day of quarantine. Refusal to take tests will result in an additional 10 days in quarantine.

 

Argentina:

Nonresident foreign nationals remain barred from entering the country until further notice. Limited domestic flights and flights from Argentina to other countries continue

Austria:

As of Oct. 19 authorities are maintaining current COVID-19 travel restrictions. Authorities have issued travel warnings for multiple countries, including nations within the EU. Travelers arriving from a country with a travel warning, or anyone who has visited these countries in the preceding 10 days, are required to present a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within 72 hours of arrival or be tested within 48 hours of arrival and self-isolate while waiting for the result. Per the most recent advisory, the Austrian government has designated travel warnings for the following countries:

Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria (Blagoevgrad, Burgas, Dobrich, Gabrovo, Jambol, Kardzhali, Montana, Plovdiv, Rasgrad, Shumen, Sliven, Smolian, Sofia, Stara Zagora, Targovishte, and Varna), Brazil, Bulgaria, Chile, China (Hubei Province), Costa Rica, Croatia (except Brod-Posavina, Istria, Koprivnica-Krizevci, Osijek-Baranja, Sibenik-Knin, Varazdin, and Zadar), Czech Republic (Prague Region), Ecuador, Egypt, France (Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur and Ile-de-France), India, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Kosovo, Kuwait, Maldives, Mexico, Moldova, Montenegro, Nigeria, North Macedonia, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Portugal (Norte Region and Lisbon), Romania, Russian Federation, Senegal, Serbia, South Africa, Spain (mainland and Balearic Islands), Turkey, Ukraine, and the US

Travelers from all EU countries without travel warnings, as well as the UK, Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, and Uruguay, are permitted to enter the country without restriction. Travel from all other countries remains prohibited indefinitely; exceptions are in place for health workers, freight workers, diplomats, individuals in transit, and urgent or essential reasons decided on a case-by-case basis. Citizens of countries not currently approved for travel but arriving from within the Schengen Area, Andorra, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Ireland, Monaco, Romania, San Marino, the UK, or the Vatican are required to provide a negative COVID-19 PCR test no older than 72 hours upon arrival.

Bangladesh:

As of Oct. 14, Bangladeshi authorities continue to gradually ease domestic restrictions previously introduced to control the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

International commercial flights from Bahrain, China, Malaysia, the Maldives, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Sri Lanka, Singapore, Turkey, the UAE, and the UK are authorized. Limited flights with India are scheduled to resume Oct. 28.

 Visa-on-arrival services remain suspended until further notice; those intending to enter Bangladesh may approach their local Bangladeshi mission for visa issuance. Authorities require foreign nationals traveling to Bangladesh by air, land, or sea to obtain a medical certificate within 72 hours of departure, indicating that they are COVID-19 negative; entrants must self-isolate for 14 days after arrival.

Land border crossings have opened for passenger transit, though restrictions by neighboring countries like India severely limit such travel. Cross-border trade is operational. Ground freight transport disruptions have occurred sporadically at the Petrapole-Benapole checkpoint on the Bangladesh-India border; recurrent disruptions are possible.

Domestic flights partially resumed June 1 and are operating on limited routes

Brazil:

Foreign citizens are allowed to enter Brazil by air, except to the states of Mato Grosso do Sul, Paraiba, Rondonia, Rio Grande do Sul, and Tocantins. Before traveling to Brazil, visitors must prove they have health insurance, and their visits must not be longer than 90 days. Officials have extended a ban on entry for all nonresident foreign nationals by land and water through at least Oct 24, with exceptions for passengers en route to another country. Most state authorities have imposed business and

Brunei:

Brunei has modified rules governing the entry and exit of passengers and vehicles as of Oct. 2, as part of its coronavirus disease (COVID-19) control measures. Effective Oct. 1, entry/exit fees are BND 3 (USD 2.20) per registered person for each one-way trip across land borders; exempted travelers include children below the age of two years, diplomats and families, as well as those with emergency passes or on official duty. Regular travelers - with proof of at least 15 monthly round trips to Brunei - may apply online for the Frequent Commuters Pass; transport operators must apply separately. Both private and commercial foreign-registered vehicles must also register with the Land Department to obtain a paid vehicle pass sticker by Oct. 15. Foreigners - including transit passengers and commercial vehicle operators - must provide results of a negative COVID-19 swab test taken within seven days before arrival in Brunei.

Most foreign nationals, including long-term pass holders, remain banned from entering or transiting Brunei. Foreigners with essential or business needs can transit through Brunei by land, with protocols in place. Measures include limiting the duration of the travel through Brunei, such as one hour for those going from Labu to Ujong Jalan in eastern Brunei or three hours for people traveling from Kuala Lurah to Sungai Tujoh in western Brunei. Additionally, foreigners whose work relates to matters of national interest, including the oil and gas sector and transport of essential goods, can also enter the country. Officials are requiring inbound foreign workers in the oil and gas industry to undergo COVID-19 tests before entering and upon arrival in the country. The employees will need to take the pre-trip test within 48 hours before departing for Brunei. Existing travel, student, and dependent visas remain suspended. Arrivals will undergo a 14-day quarantine at designated facilities.

Officials have barred local nationals, permanent residents, and foreigners holding Bruneian identification cards from leaving the country. Only people departing to seek medical treatment or to resume studies overseas can leave the country, after obtaining approval from the Prime Minister's Office. Outbound local citizens and permanent residents who require COVID-19 tests have to pay BND 100 (USD 72), while outbound foreign nationals will have to pay BND 200 (USD 144); authorities have exempted students, government employees on official duty, and people with permission from the Ministry of Health.

Cambodia:

Issuance of tourist visas and e-visas, visa-on-arrival services, and visa exemptions remain suspended. Foreign nationals intending to visit Cambodia must comply with several protocols, with limited exceptions. Requirements include obtaining a visa from a Cambodian diplomatic mission by submitting, up to 72 hours before departure, proof of at least USD 50,000 in medical insurance coverage, and a medical certificate from local health authorities stating the traveler is free from COVID-19. Arrivals have to test for COVID-19; travelers who test positive and all passengers on the same flight must quarantine for 14 days. Other travelers must self-quarantine for two weeks. Inbound foreign nationals have to pay a USD 2,000 deposit to cover costs, including USD 100 for COVID-19 testing and USD 30 for a certificate stating that they are free from the virus; only limited exceptions are allowed. Most land border checkpoints remain closed, though cross-border travel with Vietnam for non-tourism purposes has resumed with health protocols in place.

Diplomatic and official visa holders, including international organization officials, must obtain a document stating they are free from COVID-19 within 72 hours before traveling to Cambodia. The visa holders will undergo COVID-19 tests upon arriving in Cambodia and isolate at designated sites while waiting for test results. People who test negative will self-isolate for 14 days, while those testing positive will undergo quarantine. Authorities will bear the test costs; however, embassies or international organizations will have to cover expenses for visa holders who test positive.

The government has allowed foreign business travelers to enter Cambodia with exemptions from the typical two-week self-isolation requirement for arrivals. However, business visitors must still isolate at designated sites for several days upon arrival in Cambodia while waiting for COVID-19 test results. Additionally, these visitors may have to quarantine for 14 days if any passenger on their Cambodia-bound flight tests positive for COVID-19. Other protocols include obtaining sponsorship from a local company and health insurance from an approved provider. Cambodian authorities have indefinitely suspended flights from Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. Authorities may reintroduce or expand restrictions in the coming weeks, especially if local COVID-19 activity increases.

Canada:

Authorities in Canada extended a ban on entry for most nonresident foreign nationals until at least Oct 31. to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Canadian citizens and residents returning to the country will be required to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. Immediate family members of Canadian citizens or residents can enter, provided they plan to stay for at least 15 days and are able to quarantine for the first 14 days of their stay. Other nonresident foreign nationals allowed to enter must be traveling for essential reasons, and must travel either from the US or be exempt from the restrictions by virtue of being temporary workers, international students, diplomats, aircrew members, or French citizens who live in Saint-Pierre and Miquelon.

Additionally, Canadian and US governments maintain a ban on nonessential ground travel across the two nations' shared borders through at least Nov 21. The measure has been in place since March 21, and it does not affect trade or essential business travel. Canada has also tightened border restrictions for persons transiting the country to reach Alaska from the 48 contiguous US states ("Lower 48") on essential travel. Foreign nationals traveling by land to Alaska from the US Lower 48 may only enter Canada through one of five border crossings: Abbotsford-Huntington, Kingsgate, or Osoyoos in British Columbia; North Portal, Saskatchewan; or Coutts, Alberta. Travelers who attempt to enter Canada through any other border crossing will be denied entry and rerouted to an approved crossing. Persons entering Canada from Alaska may use any border crossing. The regulations specify that travelers must take the most direct route through Canada and avoid stopping at leisure sites or national parks. Violators could face fines.

Persons exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms will not be allowed to board planes to Canada, including Canadian citizens. Canadian authorities have also banned individuals displaying symptoms associated with COVID-19 from domestic air and train travel until further notice. Travelers who are denied boarding will be barred from air or train travel for at least 14 days unless they can produce a medical certificate confirming that any symptoms are unrelated to COVID-19.

All international flights to Canada - except for trade and business flights, as well as flights from the US, Mexico, Caribbean, and St. Pierre and Miquelon - are landing only at Pearson International Airport (YYZ) in Toronto, Vancouver International Airport (YVR), Montreal Trudeau Airport (YUL), and Calgary International Airport (YYC). Canadian citizens and residents returning from abroad must self-quarantine for 14 days. Authorities may order those entering the country to isolate at a hotel if they believe the traveler may put others at risk. All air passengers are required to wear protective face coverings, and all maritime and land passengers are encouraged to do the same. Officials have recommended all residents wear some form of protective face covering whenever social distancing is not possible.

China:

All passengers travelling from Hong Kong to Beijing will be required to have documentary proof for negative results for nucleic acid test for COVID-19 within seven days of the scheduled departure wef 17 Aug 2020.

Entry restrictions

Entry restriction exemption

Further entry restrictions in Sanya (SYX) and Haikou (HAK)

Additional entry requirements

Additional entry requirement for Beijing

With effect from Monday 17 August, 2020, all passengers travelling from Hong Kong to Beijing will be required to have documentary proof that:

Passengers who are unable to provide this documentation at check-in will not be accepted for travel.

The Hong Kong SAR Government’s list of recognised laboratories and healthcare institutions that conduct nucleic acid COVID-19 tests can be found here 

Transit restrictions

Visa restrictions

Quarantine measures

Reference LINK HERE                

The Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) allows flights from Canada, Cambodia, Thailand, Pakistan, Greece, Denmark, Sweden, and Austria to land directly in Beijing. Officials continue to divert other international flights to nearby cities, where passengers receive health scans; symptomatic passengers receive treatment locally, while asymptomatic passengers can continue to Beijing. CAAC has lifted all restrictions on cargo flights to airports in the capital.

The government is maintaining an entry ban for most foreign nationals. However, China is permitting foreigners with residence permits from 36 European and 13 Asia countries, including Germany, France, Spain, the UK, Japan, South Korea, Vietnam, Singapore, Thailand, and Malaysia. Travelers must reapply for visas before entering China. Specially designated foreign workers with invitation letters issued by provincial or municipal government officials can also enter the country. Some immediate family members of foreign employees may obtain visas to enter the country for emergency humanitarian purposes. Diplomatic personnel and C visa holders - generally flight and shipping crew members - are exempt from the entry ban.

Additionally, officials are permitting essential business travel from Singapore and South Korea under fast-track arrangements. Travel is possible between Singapore and Guangdong, Jiangsu, and Zhejiang provinces and Chongqing, Shanghai, and Tianjin municipalities. A fast-track arrangement for business travelers from South Korea to 10 Chinese locations, including Shanghai, as well as Liaoning, Shandong, Jiangsu, and Anhui provinces, is also in place. Companies or government agencies can apply for special passes for inbound visitors, who must test negative for COVID-19 within 48 hours of their departure from Singapore and within 72 hours of their departure from South Korea, and must obtain a visa. Passengers will undergo COVID-19 testing again upon arrival in China and isolate at designated facilities (usually hotels) until their results are available. Singapore travelers must also adhere to a preplanned itinerary; refrain from using public transport, except for private hire vehicles, for the first 14 days; and must download and use a health pass while in the country. Arriving passengers testing positive for COVID-19 will undergo health treatment at their own expense.

Authorities require all arriving passengers to take a nucleic acid COVID-19 test at designated facilities in the country of origin within three days of departure for China. Foreign nationals must apply for a health certificate via the local Chinese diplomatic mission before travel. Chinese citizens must update their information through WeChat to obtain a health code before boarding flights. As of Sept. 10, the measure applies to passengers from 118 countries, though officials plan to expand the requirement to 147 countries, including the US, by mid-September. Authorities in Yunnan, Guangxi, Inner Mongolia, and Heilongjiang are restricting the movement through land borders. Most travelers, regardless of nationality, are barred from entering or exiting border checkpoints. Exceptions are in place for cargo transport, though backlogs remain possible at border checkpoints.

The government continues to conduct health screenings, including body temperature scans and nucleic acid testing, at ports of entry nationwide. Most international travelers must quarantine for 14 days, and officials generally allow nonresident passengers to stay in government-designated hotels at their own cost. However, some governments in border areas require inbound travelers to self-quarantine and undergo medical observation for two additional weeks. The Beijing municipal government allows specific groups of travelers, including residents who live alone, travelers over 70 years old, pregnant women, and travelers with underlying conditions, to self-quarantine, with permission. The Shanghai government allows arriving residents to quarantine at a designated facility for seven days and self-quarantine for an additional seven days at home. Guangdong authorities require a negative COVID-19 test result for Hong Kong residents, who must also quarantine for 14 days unless exempted. All arrivals must receive a negative COVID-19 test result in quarantine before release from designated facilities.

Czech Republic:

Travelers from EEA countries - with the exception of Spain - as well as persons arriving from Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, Tunisia, and the UK, are allowed to enter the country without restriction. Such travelers who have spent at least 12 hours in the last 14 days in a country classified as high risk must fill out an electronic arrival form before departure and either produce proof of having tested negative for COVID-19 using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken in an EU or EEA country within no more than 72 hours before arrival, or take a COVID-19 test within five days upon arrival and submit the result to the relevant regional public health office within seven days after arrival. Individuals who take the test upon arrival are required to limit their movements to include only work- or education-related activities, procuring essential goods and medical services, and taking care of animals or children until the results are known. Individuals whose test results are positive must self-isolate for 14 days. Travel is prohibited from all other countries. Exceptions to the travel ban include residents of countries where travel restrictions have been lifted, close family members of Czech residents, persons in a relationship with a Czech citizen or resident, diplomats, transport workers, and those with urgent circumstances are decided on a case-by-case basis.

France: 

Authorities are maintaining international travel restrictions on most foreign nationals. As of Sept. 9, international arrivals from the European Economic Area (EEA) and Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Switzerland, Thailand, Tunisia, the UK, and Uruguay are permitted to enter without restriction. Most travelers from other locations remain barred from entry, though exceptions are made for French nationals and residents, and what the authorities deem essential reasons including certain necessary work, diplomats, students, and those visiting for urgent family reasons; all such arrivals are required to form declaring themselves to be COVID-19 free and present a certificate declaring their reason for travel. Permitted travelers arriving from Bahrain, Panama, the UAE, and the US must present evidence of a negative COVID-19 test taken within the previous 72 hours prior to boarding; permitted arrivals from Algeria, Argentina, Armenia, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Costa Rica, Chile Colombia, Dominican Republic, Equatorial Guinea, India, Israel, Kosovo, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Madagascar, Maldives, Mexico, Moldova, Montenegro, Oman, Palestinian Territories, Peru, Qatar, Serbia, South Africa, and Turkey must meet the same condition or take a test on arrival. Permitted travelers from all other locations are able to present a negative COVID-19 test taken within the previous 72 hours or take a test on arrival, otherwise they are required to self-isolate for 14 days.

Finland:

On Sept. 28, authorities in Finland plan to tighten international entry restrictions for travelers from several countries as part of efforts to limit the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). From this date, entry restrictions will be reimposed for travelers from Estonia, Germany, Iceland, Norway, Slovakia, Sweden, Canada, Georgia, and Tunisia. People from these countries will only be permitted to enter Finland if they are returning legal residents, traveling for essential purposes, or arriving for work-related or family reasons; in addition a 14-day self-isolation upon arrival is recommended for these travelers. The same rules already apply for travelers from Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, the Netherlands, Portugal, Romania, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK. Travel will remain permitted for local border communities along the border with Sweden and Norway; people will be able to travel for work to Finland from Sweden and Estonia without a 14-day self-isolation period. Leisure travel, with the exception of leisure boating, from all the aforementioned countries is not allowed.

In addition authorities will allow travelers from these countries to shorten the self-isolation period by undertaking two voluntary COVID-19 tests from Oct. 1. Travelers are to take the first test up to 72 hours before arrival, or at the airport upon arrival for Finnish citizens and residents, and take the second test no earlier than 72 hours after entry into the country. The persons are to remain in self-isolation until the result is known. If the test result is negative, the self-isolation period ends; if the test result is positive, the person will be placed in quarantine until they have recovered.

From Sept. 28 travelers arriving to Finland from Cyprus, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Poland, San Marino, the Vatican as well as Australia, Japan, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, New Zealand and Uruguay can enter without restrictions. Travel is prohibited from all other countries except for returning residents and persons arriving for critical work-related or essential family reasons; authorities recommend that these arrivals also self-isolate for 14 days. Authorities are reviewing all entry restrictions on a weekly basis.

Fiji:

Most foreign nationals have been effectively banned from entering the country. All arrivals are required to undergo a 14-day quarantine. Arrivals from Australia and New Zealand have the option of providing documentation verifying they spent 14 days in quarantine in their home country and tested negative for COVID-19 within 48 hours of departing for Fiji, which will allow them to avoid a strict quarantine but still remain separated from the general public. Travelers from those countries that do not provide the documentation will quarantine at their own cost at a government quarantine facility or hotel.

Authorities have called on Fijian nationals to suspend outbound travel. Inter-island transport has resumed, and Fiji Link (FJ) has restarted limited domestic flights.

Germany:

Authorities in Germany amended international entry restrictions on Oct. 9. Per the most recent regulations, travelers arriving in Germany from high-risk areas must quarantine or self-isolate for 10 days upon entry. The quarantine duration may be shortened after five days if a traveler provides negative COVID-19 test results.

As of Oct. 8, the Robert Koch Institute updated the current COVID-19-related list of high-risk locations:

As of Oct. 8, the following locations are no longer considered high risk:

Most travelers from outside of the EU and Schengen Area, with the exception of those from Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Thailand, the UK, and Uruguay, remain prohibited from entering the country. Limited exceptions are made for EU citizens and residents, diplomats, essential workers, students, freight and transport workers, individuals in transit, and for urgent reasons decided on a case-by-case basis. All such arrivals are subject to a mandatory 10-day self-isolation period which can be shortened after five days a negative COVID-19; this measure does not apply to transport and freight workers.

In addition, travelers from high-risk areas within Germany will only be allowed accommodation in a hotel in other regions if they can provide a negative COVID-19 test taken within the previous 48 hours; federal authorities are advising against nonessential travel within Germany for residents of high-risk areas. Furthermore, the state of Schleswig-Holstein requires travelers from the Schoneberg-Tempelhof, Neukolln, Kreuzberg-Friedrichshain, and Berlin-Mitte districts in Berlin to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival or provide two negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests. Other regions in the country might add stricter requirements for travelers at short notice from areas or cities considered high-risk.

Greece:

Authorities in Greece will extend nationwide restrictions and travel bans on non-EU citizens. Citizens of Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and the United Arab Emirates are exempt from the travel ban, as are freight transporters, diplomats, students enrolled at Greek universities, seasonal workers, healthcare workers, and passengers in transit.

All travelers arriving from Bulgaria, Romania, the United Arab Emirates, Malta, Belgium, Spain, Albania, Northern Macedonia, Hungary, the Czech Republic, and Poland must present a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken no more than 72 hours before arrival. Direct air connections with Turkey and Catalonia (Spain) remain suspended; flights from Albania and North Macedonia may only land at Athens International Airport (ATH). Maritime connections with Albania and Turkey also remain suspended; freight transport is exempt. Officials periodically reassess the measures and the countries exempted from the ban.

Travelers permitted to enter Greece are not automatically required to undertake a mandatory quarantine period; however, they may be required to complete a detailed declaration providing their contact details, country of origin, and travel history over the previous 15 days. Authorities conduct targeted COVID-19 testing of arriving travelers based on information provided in the declarations. Anyone testing positive for the virus could be required to quarantine for 14 days in government-provided accommodations.

Guam:
As of the morning of Feb. 3, officials are banning passengers who traveled in mainland China within 14 days of arrival. All arriving visitors from countries with COVID-19 activity are required to quarantine,

Hong Kong: 

Hong Kong SAR Government announcement - France and Russia to be added as high risk specified places , starting from October 26 until further notice. The measure is on top of the existing 11 specified places (i.e. Bangladesh, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States of America) currently in place.

Starting from 18 August 2020, those arriving Hong Kong via the Hong Kong International Airport will be required to proceed to the Temporary Specimen Collection Centre (TSCC) set up in the restricted area of the Airport for collecting their deep throat saliva samples immediately upon arrival. They will need to stay at the TSCC to wait for test results which will be available on the same day before they can proceed with immigration procedures. For passengers whose test results will not be available on the same day (usually passengers arriving in afternoons or at nights), they can proceed with immigration procedures right after collecting their deep throat saliva samples at the TSCC. They will subsequently be taken to the Holding Centre for Test Result (HCTR) of the Department of Health in hotel by coaches arranged by the Department of Health to wait for their test results. However, the Department of Health will make flexible arrangements according to its capacity and the daily number of passengers arriving on afternoon flights. If necessary, inbound travellers arriving in the afternoon could also be arranged to wait for test results at the TSCC. In general, the relevant passengers will only stay in the HCTR for one night and will be arranged to leave on the next day when their test results are available. If their test results are negative, they will be allowed to leave the hotel and go home or to a designated place immediately to continue completion of the 14-day compulsory quarantine. Confirmed cases and their close contacts will respectively be arranged for admission to hospital and sent to designated quarantine centres direct.

If the day's number of inbound travellers is expected to exceed the capacity of the two aforementioned centres, the Department of Health will adopt a triage measure based on risk assessment. Passengers arriving from areas with lower risk will proceed to the designated place for the 14-day compulsory quarantine after collecting their deep throat saliva samples at the TSCC. If their test result is positive, the Department of Health will arrange to send them to a hospital for treatment as soon as possible and arrange to send their close contacts to a quarantine centre. Link Here 

Transfer/transit services at Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) for passengers from airports in Mainland China will resume with effect from 15 August 2020 until 15 October 2020. On the other hand, transfer/transit services to destinations in Mainland China will remain unavailable at HKIA.

The enhanced measures at HKIA introduced upon resumption of transfer/transit services starting 1 June 2020 will remain effective and applicable to all origins and destinations, including the requirement that transfer/transit flights operated by different airline groups must be booked under the same air ticket, and that passengers are checked through with both boarding passes printed and baggage tagged-through to final destination. The layover time of the transfer/transit passengers at HKIA must be within 24 hours. Passengers should also confirm in advance that they are able to enter the final destination.

The Hong Kong SAR government has introduced new immigration requirements for passengers who are ending their journey in Hong Kong and have visited or transited through certain countries in the 14 days prior to arriving.

Passengers who have visited or transited through Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, South Africa or the United States will be required to show the following documents:

  1. A test report issued by a laboratory or healthcare institution that contains the passenger’s name identical to that in his/her valid travel document to show that:

The test report:

If the test report above is not in English or Chinese or does not contain all the above mentioned information, it is acceptable to present a written confirmation, in English or Chinese, issued by the laboratory or healthcare institution that contains the following information:

Please note that if there is a schedule change or flight cancellation, passengers are responsible for ensuring that their COVID-19 test meets the 72-hour requirement based on the new flight departure time.

  1. Documentary proof (in English or Chinese) to show that the laboratory or healthcare institution is ISO 15189 accredited or is recognised or approved by the relevant authority of the government of the place in which the laboratory or healthcare institution is located.

This can be in the form of a copy of ‘Certificate of Accreditation’, ‘Certificate of Compliance’, or information printed out from an official government website.

Please note that documentary proof is required even if the test report from the laboratory or healthcare institution contains an ISO accreditation reference

The Government announced on July 26 that crew change arrangement for passenger vessels and goods vessels without cargo operation in Hong Kong would be suspended with effect from July 29. The testing and quarantine arrangement for sea crew members of goods vessels coming to Hong Kong for cargo operation, air crew members and other persons exempted from quarantine requirement (exempted persons) arriving Hong Kong will also be tightened.

With effect from July 29 (Wednesday), in accordance with the risk level of respective exemption categories, the Government will tighten the testing and quarantine arrangement for exempted persons as set out below -

Sea Crew of Passenger and Goods Vessels

Air crew travelling between Hong Kong and the Mainland, Macao, Taiwan or foreign places to perform their duties

Other exempted persons arriving Hong Kong at HKIA

Hong Kong SAR Government Announcement - Specifications under the Prevention and Control of Disease (Regulation of Cross-boundary Conveyances and Travellers) Regulation gazetted - to impose conditions based on public health grounds on travellers who has visited specified high risk places within 14 days before arrival in Hong Kong, come into effect on July 25, 2020

 (1) Prevention and Control of Disease (Regulation of Cross-boundary Conveyances and Travellers) Regulation

Cap. 599H introduces a mechanism to empower the Secretary for Food and Health (the Secretary) to impose conditions related to the prevention and control of the specified disease or protection of public health, on cross-boundary conveyances arriving at Hong Kong from specified places and relevant travellers coming to Hong Kong on the conveyances. The mechanism empowers the Government to flexibly impose various conditions on travellers, either based on their originating place (e.g. specific high-risk places), or solely having regard to the office they assume (e.g. air crew or sea crew), including requiring inbound travellers from cross-boundary conveyances to obtain a negative result from a COVID-19 test conducted by a recognised laboratory before arriving at Hong Kong. The Secretary will issue directions on the above matters in due course.

If any conditions specified by the Secretary is not met in relation to any traveller on a conveyance, a health officer or authorised officer acting on the advice of a health officer may prohibit the aircraft from landing in Hong Kong or prohibit the vessel from entering or staying in the waters of Hong Kong.

To ensure the operator of a conveyance comply with the relevant requirements, the health officer or authorised officer acting on the advice of a health officer may require the operator to provide information, including information concerning the meeting of the specified conditions for the relevant traveller(s) on the said conveyance, the travel record of the conveyance or the health condition of the persons on the conveyance. As for travellers coming to Hong Kong, the health officer or authorised officer acting on the advice of a health officer may require them to provide information concerning their health condition, travel history and the meeting of the specified conditions, including their COVID-19 test results.

If any conditions specified by the Secretary is not met in relation to any relevant traveller on the conveyance, each of the operators of the conveyance commits an offence, and is liable on conviction to the maximum penalty of a fine at level 5 ($50,000) and imprisonment for six months. If an operator fails to comply with a requirement to provide information, or knowingly or recklessly provides any information that is false or misleading in a material particular, he or she is liable on conviction to the maximum penalty of a fine at level 5 ($50,000) and imprisonment for six months.

As for travellers, if a traveller coming to Hong Kong fails to comply with a requirement to provide information, or knowingly or recklessly provides any information that is false or misleading in a material particular, he or she is liable on conviction to the maximum penalty of a fine at level 3 ($10,000) and imprisonment for six months.

The Hong Kong SAR government has implemented the following travel restrictions for passengers arriving in and transiting through Hong Kong.

Entry restrictions        

Effective from 25 March 2020 (00:00 HKT), only Hong Kong residents with following documents will be permitted to enter Hong Kong:

Entry restriction exemptions

The following passengers are exempt from the entry restrictions:

Passengers travelling from Mainland China, Taiwan or Macao SAR, and have not been to other country/region in past 14 days

Hong Kong continues to restrict land border crossings with mainland China to the Shenzhen Bay checkpoint and along the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge.  Immigration processing centers at Ocean Terminal and Kai Tak Cruise Terminal remain closed. Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) remains open, and authorities will allow transit flights to resume at the airport beginning June 1.

As of 8 Jun 2020, the Hong Kong SAR Government has announced that directors or executives of certain companies listed on the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong (SEHK) who can meet the eligibility criteria may apply for exemption from the compulsory quarantine arrangement when they arrive at Hong Kong from the Mainland, subject to a pre-determined quota. The new scheme covers companies that are listed on the SEHK and included in the Hang Seng Index, Hang Seng China Enterprises Index or Hang Seng Composite LargeCap, MidCap or SmallCap Index, representing around 95 per cent of the total market capitalisation in Hong Kong. Directors or executives of these listed companies who (i) travel from the Mainland to Hong Kong for essential business activities or (ii) return from the Mainland to Hong Kong after completing essential business activities, and satisfy certain eligibility criteria may apply for exemption. For more details, please visit HKSAR government website Link Here

All travellers arriving at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) will be mandated under the Prevention and Control of Disease Regulation (Cap. 599A) to collect their deep throat saliva samples at the DH's Temporary Specimen Collection Centre at the AsiaWorld-Expo (AWE) for conducting testing for COVID-19. Pls. log on the below website for more information about the DH strengthens health quarantine and testing arrangements for inbound travellers.

The Chief Secretary for Administration has exempted the following categories of "Construction Personnel for Provision of Professional Services in the Mainland" from the compulsory quarantine arrangement with effect from May 13 this year:

(a) either the owner of an enterprise with a valid business registration certificate issued under the Business Registration Ordinance (Cap. 310) and with provision of construction-related professional services in the Mainland, and up to one person employed and so authorised by the enterprise; or

(b) up to two persons employed and so authorised by such an enterprise as described in (a).

An exempted person must only travel to and stay in the city/area where the construction-related professional services are provided for the purpose of provision of the intended construction-related professional services as approved, and must take every precautionary measure to ensure personal hygiene and avoid unnecessary social contact. After returning to Hong Kong, the exempted person will be subject to medical surveillance arranged by the Department of Health for a period of 14 days. The person will be required to wear masks and check body temperature daily, and report to the Department of Health on any discomfort.

Details of the exemption arrangement and the application form are in Annex 1 and Annex 2 respectively. The application form can be downloaded from the website of the Development Bureau Link Here 

The Hong Kong SAR Government announced (May 18) the mechanism for persons engaged in technological research and development (R&D) co-operation-related activities in the Mainland, Macao or Taiwan to apply for exemption from the compulsory quarantine arrangement.The Chief Secretary for Administration has exempted the following category of persons from the compulsory quarantine arrangement.

An eligible enterprise or institution must be:

(a) A public R&D institution in Hong Kong (i.e. the Hong Kong Applied Science and Technology Research Institute, the Automotive Platforms and Application Systems Research and Development Centre, the Hong Kong Research Institute of Textiles and Apparel, the Logistics and Supply Chain MultiTech Research and Development Centre, and the Nano and Advanced Materials Institute); or

(b) A tenant/incubatee/grantee/occupant of the Hong Kong Science and Technology Parks Corporation (HKSTPC) or Cyberport which conducts technological R&D work.

Each eligible enterprise or institution can have up to two personnel who are either the owner and/or full-time employee(s) to be exempted, and such persons have to travel to the Mainland, Macao or Taiwan for conducting one of the following R&D-related activities:

(a) on-the-ground R&D work requiring collaboration with an enterprise or institution in the Mainland, Macao or Taiwan;

(b) sourcing of essential materials or equipment which are required to sustain the technological R&D work carried out in Hong Kong by the eligible enterprise or institution; or

(c) overseeing the operations of the eligible enterprise or institution's research facility(ies) in the Mainland, Macao or Taiwan.

An exempted person must undertake to fulfill the following requirements:

(a) he/she must only travel for the purpose of conducting the technological R&D activities as approved;

(b) he/she must only travel to and stay in the city in which the relevant facility(ies), enterprise(s) or institution(s) with the approved technological R&D activities is/are located;

(c) he/she must take every precautionary measure to ensure personal hygiene and avoid unnecessary social contact whilst in the Mainland, Macao or Taiwan; and

(d) after returning to Hong Kong, he/she will be subject to medical surveillance arranged by the Department of Health (DH) for a period of 14 days. He/she will be required to wear masks and check body temperature daily, as well as to report to the DH on any discomfort.

Details of the exemption arrangement and the application form are available on the ITC website Link Here.

Tenants/incubatees/grantees/occupants of the HKSTPC or Cyberport should submit the completed application form with all required supporting documents to the ITC through the HKSTPC (ECQ@hkstp.org) or Cyberport (ECQ@cyberport.hk) as appropriate. Public R&D institutions should submit the completed application form with all required supporting documents directly to the ITC by email (ECQ@itc.gov.hk).

And certified public accountants (practising), partners, directors or employees of registered practice units of the Hong Kong Institute of Certified Public Accountants (HKICPA) who are required to travel to the Mainland to conduct audit work for companies listed in Hong Kong with Mainland operations may apply for exemption from the compulsory quarantine arrangement.

In accordance with the above-mentioned provision, the Chief Secretary for Administration has designated the following category of persons for exemption from the compulsory quarantine arrangement:

Certified public accountants (practising), partners, directors or employees of practice units registered with the HKICPA under the Professional Accountants Ordinance (Cap. 50), who are required to travel to the Mainland to conduct audit work for companies listed on a recognised stock market (as defined by section 1 of Part 1 of Schedule 1 to the Securities and Futures Ordinance (Cap. 571)) and having Mainland operations, to assist those companies to fulfil their obligations under relevant Ordinances or other regulatory instruments that govern the operation of the companies or their business.

An exempted person must only travel to and stay in the Mainland area/city where the professional services of auditing are provided for the purpose of provision of the intended professional services of auditing as approved, and must take every precautionary measure to ensure personal hygiene and avoid unnecessary social contact whilst in the Mainland. After returning to Hong Kong, the exempted person will be subject to medical surveillance arranged by the Department of Health for a period of 14 days. The person will be required to wear masks and check body temperature daily, and report to the Department of Health on any discomfort. Reference Link Here.

The University of Hong Kong – Shenzhen Hospital (HKUSZH) and Hong Kong enterprises providing medical or dental services in the Mainland to apply for exemption from the compulsory quarantine arrangement under our local regime. The following categories of persons from the compulsory quarantine arrangement:

1.up to 50 persons employed and so authorised by HKUSZH; and

2.(i) either the owner of a Hong Kong enterprise with a valid Hong Kong Service Supplier Certificate in relation to the provision of medical and dental services in the Mainland under the Mainland and Hong Kong Closer Economic Partnership Arrangement, and up to one person employed and so authorised by the enterprise; or

(ii) up to two persons employed and so authorised by such an enterprise as described in (i).

Each exempted person must take a COVID-19 nucleic acid test at HKUSZH within seven days before entry to Hong Kong (starting from the date of collection of sample) and present a valid certificate of negative test result to authorised officers at the control points.

An exempted person must only travel to and stay in the areas/cities where the services are provided for the purpose of provision of the intended services as approved, and must take every precautionary measure to ensure personal hygiene and avoid unnecessary social contact. After returning to Hong Kong, the exempted person will be subject to medical surveillance arranged by the Department of Health for a period of 14 days. The person will be required to wear masks and check body temperature daily, and report to the Department of Health on any discomfort.

All exempted persons should note that currently travellers to the Mainland would still be subject to the 14-day compulsory quarantine requirement imposed by the Mainland authorities. The Government of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region is discussing with authorities in the Mainland on mutual recognition of COVID-19 testing results conducted by recognised medical laboratories, with a view to exempting the quarantine requirement for Hong Kong travellers to the Mainland. Details of the arrangement will be announced when available.

The details of the exemption arrangement and the application forms are available for download from the website of the Food and Health Bureau (FHB)Link Here.

All nonresident foreign nationals remain prohibited from entering or transiting the territory. For passengers arriving from countries designated by the Hong Kong government as high risk for COVID-19 infection, such as Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, the Philippines, Nepal, South Africa, the United States, and Kazakhstan, authorities require several documents, including evidence of a negative COVID-19 test result. Travelers from Macau, Taiwan, and mainland China may enter Hong Kong, provided they have no recent travel history elsewhere. All arriving travelers must self-quarantine for two weeks; officials may quarantine symptomatic passengers or people testing positive for COVID-19 at government-designated facilities. Authorities have exempted some mainland Chinese teachers and students, as well as businesspeople whose activities officials deem economically beneficial to the territory, from the mandatory 14-day quarantine

Hungary:

Authorities in Hungary are extending the nation's coronavirus disease (COVID-19) related border restrictions until Nov. 1. Only the citizens of the Visegrad Four Group, which includes the Czech Republic, Poland, and Slovakia, will be allowed entry to Hungary provided they can provide a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken within five days of arrival. Officials will not permit entry to nonresidents of other countries.  Military convoys, foreign diplomats, international students, freight transporters, business travelers, and individuals providing humanitarian aid are exempt from this measure. In addition, all Hungarian citizens returning to the country Sept. 1-30 are required to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival or present two negative PCR tests taken two days apart. Authorities are only accepting tests administered by Hungarian testing centers for Hungarian citizens.

Budapest Ferenc Liszt (BUD) and Debrecen (DEB) airports are open, though many airlines have suspended or curtailed flights. The demand for tickets on available flights is high, and enhanced health screenings could prompt processing delays at the airport.

India:

India plans to relax domestic measures related to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in areas outside containment zones further from 0001 Oct. 15.Most international flights remain suspended, except for limited repatriation and 'air bubble' travel. As of Oct. 1, all international arrivals may avail on-arrival testing in entry airports with such facilities. Passengers must pre-book a test through the Air Suvidha portal and wait at the entry airport for seven hours after testing before boarding a connecting domestic flight or exiting the airport. Asymptomatic travelers with a negative test result are exempt from institutional quarantine but are subject to state-specific home quarantine rules.

Interstate and international travelers must typically undergo quarantine for at least 14 days; symptomatic passengers are likely to do so at designated facilities, while asymptomatic persons may complete it at home or paid accommodation. Those planning a short stay less than 72 hours may be exempt from quarantine in some states such as Karnataka and Punjab; such travelers must apply for a travel pass beforehand. Testing is mandatory upon entry into multiple regions like Sikkim State, as well as Jammu and Kashmir Union Territory. State authorities are likely to modify guidelines at short notice according to the local situation. Most domestic and international travel requires registration on the national Aarogya Setu mobile application as well as state-specific online portals for contact tracing purposes.

Authorities are advising Indian citizens to delay all nonessential international travel. Most international passenger travel remains effectively banned until further notice, with some exceptions for the repatriation of Indian citizens and foreign nationals stranded in India, business travelers other than those with B-3 sporting visas, and OCI cardholders and their relatives. Family members of those in India with diplomatic, official, or UN/international organization visas are also permitted to enter India. Mentioned travelers must approach Indian consulates for new visas, regardless of previous visa status; they may enter the country via nonscheduled flights, or limited scheduled flights permitted under bilateral agreements due to an ongoing ban on most commercial international passenger flights. Such arrangements are operational between Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bhutan, Canada, France, Iraq, Japan, Kenya, Qatar, Maldives, Nigeria, UAE, UK, and the US as of Oct. 1;  modifications at short notice are possible. All entrants to the country must undergo a paid institutional quarantine of seven days, followed by a week-long home quarantine. Exemptions are possible for some categories of asymptomatic passengers, including those with a negative swab test for COVID-19 obtained within 96 hours before entry, requiring special care such as elderly or pregnant women, and parents accompanied by children aged below 10 years. Arriving passengers must register online within 72 hours before travel; different states may impose variable quarantine and testing requirements; those seeking exemptions and waivers must do so from authorities in all intended destinations and transit states before arrival. Officials have suspended visa issuance and canceled previously issued visas for all international travelers, except for holders of most business, diplomatic, official, UN/international organizations, employment, and project visas. Foreign nationals already in the country can apply online to avail of a free visa extension valid for 30 days after the resumption of regular international commercial flights.

Indonesia: 

Indonesian and Singaporean officials plan to start accepting cross-border travel applications for business and official purposes from Oct. 26. Travelers allowed to enter Indonesia under the scheme must have a sponsoring Indonesian government agency or company, test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before departure, and receive another COVID-19 test upon arrival. Authorities will provide more information on the requirements in the coming days.

Indonesia's central government is requiring intercity land and sea travelers to produce certificates stating they have tested negative from coronavirus disease (COVID-19) to stem the spread of the virus. Domestic air travelers need to provide a doctor's letter certifying the absence of flu-like symptoms, or medical certification with a maximum 14-day validity confirming negative results of a swab or rapid COVID-19 test. The passengers also have to show their identification documents and download the PeduliLindungi contact tracing application. Officials had previously required air travelers to obtain documents stating they do not carry COVID-19, before canceling this regulation. Authorities are also requiring planes and public land transport to operate with 70 percent of their capacity, while private-hire vehicles and taxis can operate with 50 percent of the capacity. There is no capacity limit for sea transport, though other health protocols are in place.

The government continues to ban foreigners from entering or transiting the country, with exemptions for permanent residents, diplomats, and transport workers, among others. Authorities have postponed plans to allow foreign tourists to enter Bali; officials said the entry restrictions would remain in place in Bali and the rest of Indonesia through at least December. Officials require inbound passengers to produce documents stating they are free from COVID-19; travelers without such documentation must undergo tests upon arrival in Indonesia and be isolated in a government-designated facility until test results are released. Arrivals must also download the PeduliLindungi contact tracing application. Inbound travelers who show COVID-19 symptoms will undergo quarantine at government-designated premises. Authorities are advising all incoming passengers to self-quarantine for two weeks. Officials are also requiring individuals leaving Indonesia to produce certificates that they do not carry COVID-19. The government has sometimes provided conflicting information about COVID-19 restrictions in recent weeks; changes to measures may occur at short notice.

Israel:

Restrictions on outgoing air travel at Israel's Ben Gurion Airport (TLV) will be lifted starting Oct. 16 amid decreasing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) infection rates. Under the current restriction, which is in effect though 2359 Oct. 15, only individuals who purchased an airplane ticket before 1400 Sept. 25 are permitted to leave the country; those who purchased a ticket after that point are barred from departing. Beginning Oct. 16, all individuals will be permitted to board outgoing flights.

Israel's ban on entry by nonresident foreign nationals remains in effect. There are currently no restrictions on Israelis returning to the country. Cargo and emergency flights remain unaffected. The Ministry of Health has exempted Israeli citizens and residents returning from certain countries with low COVID-19 infection rates from the nation's mandatory 14-day quarantine. These countries are Australia, Bulgaria, Canada, Cuba, Cyprus, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hong Kong, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Jordan, Latvia, Lithuania, New Zealand, Norway, Rwanda, Serbia, Seychelles, Singapore, Taiwan, Thailand, the UK, the United Arab Emirates, and Uruguay. Israeli citizens and legal residents returning from any other destination are subject to the quarantine requirement. Arriving travelers who cannot demonstrate that they can self-quarantine at home will be isolated at a government-established facility.

Italy:

Authorities in Italy have tightened coronavirus (COVID-19)-related entry restrictions for travelers from certain countries. Effective Oct. 8, individuals traveling from Belgium, the Czech Republic, France, the Netherlands, Spain, and the UK, or who have visited these countries in the previous 14 days, are required to present evidence of a negative COVID-19 molecular or antigenic test taken within the previous 72 hours on arrival. Alternatively individuals may opt to take a test at the airport, or self-isolate and arrange to take a test within 48 hours of arrival for airports without testing capabilities; a positive result will require the traveler to quarantine until two consecutive negative tests have been recorded.

This measure has already been in place for travelers from Bulgaria but, as of Oct. 8, it no longer applies for travelers from Croatia, Greece, and Malta. Travelers from most other EU countries, Andorra, Iceland, Liechtenstein, Monaco, Norway, San Marino, Switzerland, and the Vatican City, are permitted to enter the country without restriction.

Travelers from Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, and Uruguay are permitted to enter Italy but must register with authorities and self-isolate for 14 days.

All travel from Armenia, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Kosovo, Kuwait, North Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Oman, Panama, Peru, Dominican Republic, and Serbia is prohibited except for Italian residents and their immediate families, and government workers. Most travel is prohibited from all other countries with the exception of that being conducted for study, proven work needs, and urgent reasons such as health; all such arrivals are also required to register and self-isolate for 14 days on arrival. Transport and health workers, individuals in-transit through Italy, and those staying in Italy for less than 120 hours for work reasons are not required to self-isolate.

Japan: 

Japan will allow short-term business and official travel from South Korea under the country's Business Track scheme starting Oct. 8, despite ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) activity. South Korean business travelers can enter the country with limited or no quarantine time but must provide authorities with a copy of their itinerary, travel primarily between accommodations and worksites, and remain in contact with health officials during the first 14 days of their visit. The same arrangement is in place for short-term business travelers from Singapore. Authorities also announced a Residence Track agreement with South Korea, allowing long-term travel for residents with a 14-day quarantine period. Residence Track agreements are already in place for people in Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia, Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, Singapore, Brunei, and Taiwan.

An entry ban for most foreign nationals with a travel history to 159 countries and territories, including China, India, Pakistan, the US, Australia, and all EU member countries, remains in place. Authorities permit permanent residents; foreigners with a student, work, or long-term resident visa: and spouses and children of Japanese nationals and permanent residents to enter, regardless of their departure date from the country. Eligible foreign nationals must get a Re-entry Confirmation Letter from the nearest Japanese diplomatic mission and provide documentation of a negative COVID-19 test result obtained within 72 hours of departure to enter the country. Officials are only accepting polymerase chain reaction (PCR), loop-mediated isothermal amplification method (LAMP), or chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (CLEIA) antigen tests.

Officials require all passengers to undergo a PCR COVID-19 test upon arrival. Inbound passengers, including Japanese citizens, must self-quarantine for 14 days; travelers may isolate at a predetermined facility or at home but must arrange accommodations in advance. Individuals under quarantine orders and Business Track visitors must refrain from using public transportation and download the government-support contact tracing mobile phone application.

Flights from South Korea and China are only authorized to land at Narita International Airport (NRT) and Kansai International Airport (KIX). Transit flights for foreign nationals are only allowed through NRT.

Visa restrictions - The first and multiple visas issued by the Japanese embassy or consulates located in China and South Korea have been suspended.

Visa exemptions for Hong Kong (including HKSAR passport and BNO passport), Macau passport and South Korea passport have been suspended.

We have checked with Japan Consulate in Hong Kong, from midnight on March 9, all passengers travel (including Japan national) to Japan from China (including Hong Kong & Macau) and KoreaHK will need to wait 14 days at the location designated by the quarantine director and not use public transport within the country.

And Visa exemptions for Apec card holder with HKSAR passport, BNO passport, Macau passport and South Korea passport have also been suspended.

Macau:

On Oct. 13, officials in Macau imposed mandatory quarantine requirements on individuals with recent travel history in Qingdao. Any individual who has been in Qingdao within the previous 14 days is required to undergo a 14-day quarantine period upon arrival in Macau. The policy will remain in effect until further notice.

Macau continues to ban most foreign nationals from entering the territory. Macau residents and locals from Hong Kong, Taiwan, and mainland China can enter the special administrative region provided they have not traveled to other countries or territories within 14 days. Individuals arriving from most areas of mainland China are subject to health questionnaires and screenings. Passengers with a travel history to designated high-risk areas of mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and foreign countries within 14 days of arrival must undergo mandatory quarantine at designated hotels. Officials require arrivals to pay for quarantine fees of USD 700 from Sept. 1; locals are exempt from the fees for their first entry but must pay for subsequent quarantine periods unless traveling for select purposes.

Officials have introduced a closed management system with Hong Kong for cargo crews; the program exempts shipping crew members from quarantine regulations as long as they undergo coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing weekly, maintain green health codes, and refrain from disembarking in Hong Kong. Macau residents can also travel to mainland China without quarantine requirements, provided they have not gone elsewhere, including Hong Kong, within the previous 14 days and obtain a negative nucleic acid COVID-19 test within seven days of entry.

Transport between Macau and Hong Kong remains available only via the Hong Kong-Zhuhai-Macau Bridge. Several airlines have suspended flights at Macau International Airport (MFM); further flight cancellations are likely due to decreased demand.

Malaysia:

State authorities in Sarawak are imposing strict travel restrictions Oct. 4-18 due to high coronavirus disease (COVID-19) activity in neighboring states and peninsular Malaysia. Authorities have banned entry from Sabah State and Labuan territory, except for Sarawak residents with prior permission to return. All other arrivals from international and domestic destinations must apply online for entry permission, as well as submit an electronic health declaration form within 12 hours before entry. All entrants - including returning Sarawak residents from Sabah and Labuan - must also undergo a 14-day quarantine with COVID-19 swab testing on the second and tenth days; nonresidents of Sarawak must pay for quarantine and tests. Authorities will exempt approved regular travelers, such as workers in essential and strategic economic sectors, from quarantine, while enforcing testing every 14 days. Officials may expand or extend the measures if COVID-19 activity increases locally, or remains high in neighboring regions.

Malaysia continues to adjust restrictions to stem the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as of Sept. 8. Officials announced Sept. 7 that under the Periodic Commuting Arrangement (PCA) scheme for crossborder travel with Singapore, only people traveling to Johor State can quarantine at their residence or accommodation for seven days upon arrival, while those who are going to other Malaysian states must isolate at government-designated facilities for a week. The travelers can leave the quarantine sites upon testing negative for COVID-19. The PCA program allows long-term work visa holders to undertake multiple-entry visits through land border crossings at Woodlands or Tuas for 90-day stays once their applications are approved. The travelers are eligible for a home leave of two to four weeks after every minimum stay of 90 days in the country where they work.

Malaysia continues to adjust restrictions to stem the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as of Sept. 3. While the government exempts some groups of foreigners from entry restrictions, officials will no longer allow entry for foreigners from countries with more than 150,000 COVID-19 cases from Sept. 7.

Most foreigners are still unable to enter the country; exemptions are in place for resident diplomats, foreign spouses, and dependents of Malaysian citizens, long-term pass holders, and expatriate employees working in essential industries and their dependents, among others. Officials announced Sept. 1 that starting from Sept. 7, long-term pass holders from India, Indonesia, and the Philippines will no longer be able to enter Malaysia; authorities attributed the policy to increasing COVID-19 activity in the three countries. Travelers who can enter Malaysia must test for COVID-19 upon arrival. Those who test positive will undergo treatment at medical facilities, while those who test negative will undergo quarantine for 14 days at designated facilities. Travelers must also download the MySejahtera mobile app. Foreigners may transit at Malaysian airports as long as they do not pass through the immigration point.

Cross-border travel with Singapore for essential business and work purposes restarted Aug. 17. Those planning single-entry trips under the Reciprocal Green Lane (RGL) must present approval letters by immigration authorities and a company or government agency in the destination country, visas if required according to nationality, and undergo COVID-19 swab testing within 72 hours prior to travel date as well as upon arrival. Such travelers must also adhere to a pre-approved itinerary limited to a maximum of 14 days, and follow local rules for social distancing. 

Maldives:

Beginning Sept. 10, authorities in the Maldives will require all tourists and short-term visitors arriving in the country to present a negative coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test result upon arrival. The test must be taken no more than 72 hours before departing to the Maldives. Inbound foreign travelers must reserve accommodations at either one resort or a maximum of two different approved resorts, where they are to spend their entire time in the Maldives, except when visiting dining facilities and recreation venues approved by the Ministry of Tourism. While there is no mandatory quarantine for asymptomatic travelers, all persons entering the country must submit an online health declaration via the "Imuga" portal within 24 hours before travel. Officials may modify regulations based on a passenger's nationality and travel history, and authorities could suspend international travel at short notice. Only foreign tourists in transit can check into hotels or guesthouses in the Greater Male urban area; others must stay in resorts, where officials may enforce temporary movement restrictions in the event of confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases. Authorities have advised Maldivian citizens to refrain from all nonessential international travel. Citizens and long-term residents are required to undergo 14-day home quarantines upon arrival.

Mongolia:
The government has effectively banned international travel. The country closed its last open border crossing with Russia March 28. Commercial flights connecting Mongolia with Russia, Kazakhstan, China, Japan, South Korea, and Turkey remain suspended. International train services with Russia have stopped through at least April 30. Authorities are placing arriving Mongolian citizens who have recently traveled in China, Japan, South Korea, Italy, or Iran under a 14-day quarantine at their own expense.

Myanmar:

Myanmar has extended the international flight ban through Oct. 31 amid increased local coronavirus disease (COVID-19) activity. Relief and cargo flights can continue operating. Authorities may also allow special flights to transport citizens to and from Myanmar on a case-by-case basis.

Domestic airlines have canceled flights nationwide through at least Sept. 30.Visa-on-arrival and e-visa services remain suspended. Exemptions include resident diplomats and UN officials. Returning Myanmar nationals must undergo a 21-day quarantine at government-designated sites, followed by one week of self-isolation. Resident diplomats and UN officials may undergo quarantine at their residence for two weeks.

Additionally, authorities are allowing business trips for essential sectors, such as oil, gas, and power, from mainland China and Japan in a so-called fast lane arrangement. Personnel will have to obtain a medical document stating they do not carry COVID-19 within 36 hours of boarding Myanmar-bound flights, and will also have to undergo COVID-19 tests upon arriving in Myanmar and after completing five days of quarantine at designated facilities. Officials said they plan to add more countries to the fast lane scheme in the coming months. The government has restricted cross-border movements at land checkpoints, allowing only the transport of goods.

Morocco:

Authorities in Morocco have extended the suspension of passenger flights until further notice as part of the nation's efforts to slow the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). However, domestic flights resumed June 27. The measure does not apply to cargo and emergency flights.The suspension of sea travel to Spain, Gibraltar, and France, and the closure of the border with the Spanish autonomous cities of Ceuta and Melilla on the north coast of Africa remain in effect.

Nevertheless, the country's borders are open to authorized business visitors, i.e. those persons with an invitation from a Moroccan company to travel to the country and confirmed hotel reservations. The invitation from a Moroccan company must include the traveler's full name and passport number, the purpose of the visit, and the length of stay in the country. Royal Air Maroc (AT) has announced that it will accommodate and allow foreigners who meet the government's requirements to fly with the airline.

Nepal:

Nepali authorities are allowing the resumption of international flights from selected destinations from Sept. 1. However, flights remain limited and mostly serve returning Nepali citizens and residents. Authorities have suspended on-arrival and electronic visa issuance for all others except those officially affiliated to international development organizations and diplomatic missions. Those wishing to travel to Nepal must contact their local Nepali diplomatic mission for visa approval; officials may require medical certification and employment letters. Approved travelers to Nepal must submit negative results of a PCR test conducted within 72 hours before the travel date. Entrants must also furnish a hard copy of their online registration on the COVID-19 Crisis Management Centre website upon arrival and undergo a 14-day home quarantine. Foreigners already in Nepal may obtain paid visa extensions through Dec. 15.

Authorities will allow domestic flights and inter-district travel to resume from Sept. 21.Nepal is permitting citizens returning from neighboring countries through land border crossings to enter only via 10 checkpoints through at least Sept. 16, namely Birgunj of Parsa District, Belahiya in Rupandehi District, Gaddachauki in Kanchanpur District, Gaur in Rautahat district, Gauriphanta in Kailai District, Jamunaha in Banke District, Kakarbhitta in Jhapa District, Krishnanagar in Kapilvastu District, Madar in Siraha District, and Rani in Morang District. All citizens returning via land routes without PCR test results must undergo a self-paid, seven-day quarantine at a designated hotel; officials may advise further self-isolation, home quarantine, or institutional quarantine based on medical screening outcomes. Officials are allowing cargo transit at land borders. The Rasuwagadi and Tatopani crossings with China are open. Cargo handlers must follow health precautions, including wearing protective gear and undergoing frequent medical screenings. Land border trade with India is limited to the import of essential items as well. Shipping disruptions are possible, especially if Nepalese authorities reintroduce the mandate prohibiting transporters without Nepalese citizenship.

Netherlands

As of Oct. 16, Belgium, France, UK, Hungary, Ireland, Poland, Slovenia, and Slovakia are marked as code orange, indicating that all travelers arriving from these countries are required to self-isolate for 10 days upon arrival.

As of Oct. 13, the Netherlands continues to maintain restrictions on international travelers from some regions as part of efforts to limit the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Although authorities previously removed entry restrictions for travelers from European Economic Area countries, officials have reimposed specific travel advisories for certain areas in this bloc.

Travelers from the following locations are required to self-quarantine for 10 days upon arrival:

Residents of Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, the UK, Uruguay, and China are exempt from the self-quarantine rules. Residents of all other countries remain barred from entry, though exceptions are made for individuals with an essential function or need, such as health workers, on-duty security forces personnel, freight workers, and diplomats; all such travelers are required to self-isolate for 10 days on arrival.

New Zealand:

An entry ban for most foreign nationals remains in place. Authorities have allowed select foreign nationals to enter the country. However, restrictions on inbound travel may be tightened at short notice. Officials lifted a requirement for partners and dependents of citizens to return to the country together, provided they have a visa based on the relationship or usually reside in New Zealand. Such travelers and diplomats posted in New Zealand can enter the country without obtaining prior consent from the government. Authorities permit partners, dependents, and legal guardians of citizens without visas to enter the country. Entry is also possible for humanitarian reasons, Australian citizens and permanent residents that live in New Zealand, and Samoan and Tongan citizens on essential trips approved by their governments.

The government is also permitting some critical workers to travel to New Zealand on short-term visas valid up to six months. Companies must apply for a visa and demonstrate that the employee is working on infrastructure projects or possesses technical skills unobtainable within the country. Additionally, the government will allow some long-term, essential workers provided they meet short-term entrance criteria and earn twice the median salary in the country or participate in a government-backed event. The government requires people from these groups to receive permission before traveling to the country and will review applications for travel on a case-by-case basis.

Authorities continue to quarantine inbound passengers at government-designated facilities for 14 days. Quarantined passengers must test negative for COVID-19 and undergo two additional tests before departing facilities. Authorities have also extended the ban on cruise ships entering New Zealand ports; cargo and fishing vessels will be allowed to load and unload and undertake repairs. Vessel crews arriving in New Zealand are required to spend 14 days in quarantine unless they had been on the vessel for 28 days before docking at the port.

Norway:

Norwegian authorities updated their list of high-risk countries as of Oct. 10 to include all EU and Schengen Area countries, along with the UK, excluding Greenland, Kalmar County in Sweden, and all of Finland except for Etela-Savo, Central Finland, Helsinki and Uusimaa, North Karelia, and Vaasa, which are designated as moderate-risk. Travelers from high-risk ("red") areas must self-isolate for ten days upon arrival, while those arriving from locations designated as having a moderate risk of infection ("yellow" areas) are not required to self-isolate.

Travelers from most other countries are currently prohibited from entering Norway. Individuals with close family in Norway and individuals who have been granted permits to work or study in the country are exempt from the travel ban. Travelers entering under these exemptions must self-isolate for 10 days. Authorities continue to advise against all nonessential travel abroad.

Philippines: 

Due to the evolving COVID-19 situation, PAL and the Philippine Government have issued precautionary measures, mandatory protocols and requirements for travelers. For passengers in international flights to the Philippines, please be guided on new arrival and quarantine procedures in Manila, Cebu, and Clark. Passengers in international flights to the Philippines must register before flight departure. For more information, please refer to Philippine Airlines website. Click Here 

The Philippines will resume some domestic flights from June 3 amid ongoing coronavirus disease (COVID-19) measures. National carrier Philippine Airlines (PR) AirAsia (AK), and Cebu Pacific (5J) plan to reopen domestic routes connecting Manila (MNL) to airports in several other cities, including Cebu (CEB), Davao (DVO), Dumaguete (DGT), and Cagayan de Oro (CGY).

The government is allowing nonessential outbound travel to resume from Oct. 21. Overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) and uniformed personnel on official duty can continue traveling outside the country. Most foreign nationals remain banned from entering the country. Exceptions are in place for foreign nationals with long-term visas, among others. Inbound foreign nationals must secure a quarantine facility and a COVID-19 testing provider prior to arrival. Other visas and applications and visa-free privileges remain suspended. Exemptions for foreign spouses and children of Philippine citizens and diplomatic staff and dependents are in place. Arriving travelers must undergo a two-week quarantine at government-designated facilities.

Romania:
Travelers arriving from China, Iran, South Korea, or the Italian regions of Lombardy, Veneto, and Emilia Romagna, are required to self-isolate for 14 days. Travelers who have visited certain designated outbreak hotspots in China, Italy, or South Korea could be placed into institutional quarantine.

Russia:
Russian authorities will bar Chinese nationals from entering Russia beginning Feb. 20 as a means of preventing the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The ban currently applies to all Chinese travelers, including those with business, work, student, personal, or tourist visas; Chinese travelers with transit visas will be permitted to transit Russian airports. The duration of the measures will likely depend on the course of the outbreak in China and other countries.

Russian suspended all regular and charter flights between Russian and foreign airports from March 25. The suspension will not apply to flights repatriating Russian citizens or other specific flights approved by the Russian government on an individual basis.

Singapore:

Starting Oct. 15, authorities will require arrivals who have traveled to Malaysia's Sabah State within the past 14 days to quarantine at government-designated facilities for two weeks. The policy, which is in response to higher COVID-19 activity in the Malaysian state, also affects people using the special cross-border travel arrangements. Authorities will also ease quarantine rules for arrivals from Hong Kong and allow such passengers to serve stay-at-home notice (SHN) at their residence for seven days from Oct. 15. Additionally, starting Oct. 20, officials will require passengers with recent travel history to Indonesia or the Philippines to test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before departure; similar rules are in place for entrants from India. Travelers must test negative for COVID-19 at the end of their SHN before they can leave the SHN facilities; the same protocols are in place for travelers from mainland China, Macau, Malaysia (excluding Sabah State), and Taiwan.

Singapore continues to adjust controls, including travel restrictions, to stem the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as of Oct. 12. Authorities will start accepting applications for business and other official travels with Indonesia in a so-called Reciprocal Green Lane (RGL) arrangement from Oct. 26, with protocols such as compulsory COVID-19 tests before travel and upon arrival. The government will provide further information on the scheme in the coming days. Similar travel arrangements are in place with Brunei, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, along with Guangdong, Jiangsu, and Zhejiang provinces and Chongqing, Shanghai, and Tianjin municipalities in mainland China. Travelers allowed to enter Singapore under the existing programs must have a sponsoring Singaporean government agency or company, seek prior approval from the Singaporean authorities, and test negative for COVID-19 within 48-72 hours before departure. Upon arrival, they must receive another COVID-19 test and remain at their accommodation until the test returns negative; they must also adhere to controlled itineraries for the first 14 days of their visit.

The Johor Causeway, which links Singapore to Malaysia, is open 0700-1900 daily. State carrier Singapore Airlines (SQ) and its subsidiaries, Scoot (TR) and SilkAir (MI), continue to suspend most flights but plan to resume operations to several locations gradually. Singapore-based airline JetStar Asia Airways (3K) has resumed some routes. Foreigners flying with SQ, TR, and MI from select cities can transit via Singapore Changi Airport (SIN).

Effective Oct. 8, Singapore will allow entry for all travelers, including returning Singapore citizens and residents, from Australia, except Victoria State, and Vietnam. Passengers must register online on the Safe Travel portal beginning Oct. 1 and at least seven days before the planned entry date. Applicants must have remained in either Australia (excluding Victoria State) or Vietnam for the last 14 consecutive days before entry. Travelers must self-isolate until results from an on-arrival coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test are ready; those who test negative are exempt from the compulsory Stay-Home Notice, though they must still use the TraceTogether mobile application for contact racing purposes. Officials will also allow locals to travel to the mentioned destinations. Similar arrangements are ongoing for passengers from Brunei and New Zealand since Sept. 8.

Starting Sept. 17, officials will require arrivals who have been in India in the past 14 days to test negative for COVID-19 within 72 hours before the trip. Authorities attributed the policy to increasing COVID-19 activity in India.

Officials continue to ban entry of short-term visa holders, including work pass holders who are not providing essential services, with exceptions. Long-term visit pass and student pass holders must apply for official approval before traveling to Singapore. Incoming passengers must submit online health declarations up to three days before arrival. All travelers must serve stay-at-home notice (SHN) for 14 days at government-designated premises, with exceptions. Travelers who spent the previous two weeks in Australia (except Victoria State), mainland China, Macau, Malaysia, Taiwan, and Vietnam can serve a seven-day SHN in their residences. Travelers must test negative for COVID-19 at the end of their SHN before they can leave the SHN facilities. Long-term pass holders from Malaysia traveling under the Periodic Commuting Arrangement (PCA) program must isolate upon arrival for at least seven days or until they test negative for COVID-19, whichever is later.

South Korea:

Officials continue to ban cruise ships from docking at ports in the country, including Jeju. Busan requires ships from Bangladesh, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, the Philippines, Russia, and Uzbekistan entering Gamcheon Port to use the QR code system to enhance contact tracing for crew members. Korean air carriers are gradually resuming flight operations, but service remains limited. International flight disruptions are likely to continue amid decreased demand.

US Forces Korea (USFK) has maintained Health Protection Condition (HPCON) Bravo, the second-lowest level, for most of the country since Sept. 24. However, HPCON Charlie, the second-highest level, remains in place for most of the Greater Seoul area. The alert level reduces staff numbers at US military installations and requires service members to stay on base, except for official and essential duties. Other travel requires approval. Travel to installations in Greater Seoul remains suspended, except for official visits; however, personnel in the region can travel to bases under HPCON Bravo for approved reasons. Officials are conducting health checks for all personnel at entrance points. A USFK Public Health Emergency declaration remains in place through at least Nov. 18; further extensions are possible.

Visa-free and visa-waiver programs remain suspended with countries that have banned entry for South Korean citizens, impacting travelers from 90 countries. Long-term visa holders resident in South Korea must obtain permits before departing the country and present medical screenings with proof of a negative COVID-19 test result before reentry. Authorities have suspended visa-free entry for foreign sailors, who must obtain visas and provide a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) COVID-19 test result issued within 48 hours before departure to enter the country. The government is limiting visas and flight capacity for passengers from Bangladesh, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Uzbekistan. Officials also require a medical certificate confirming that inbound travelers received a negative PCR COVID-19 test result within 48 hours of departure. Diplomats and people on urgent business travel from these high-risk countries are exempt from the restriction.

Authorities allow "fast track" entry for essential business trips and official travel from Singapore, mainland China, Japan, UAE, and Indonesia. Under the agreements, inbound travelers must provide a negative COVID-19 test result taken within 71-96 hours, depending on the country, and a health certificate. Travelers must also take another COVID-19 test upon arrival, await the result before entering South Korea, and continue to abide by health surveillance procedures.

Most incoming travelers must undergo COVID-19 testing within three days of arrival. Mandatory screenings are ongoing for international arrivals at all ports of entry nationwide, and testing is almost certain for symptomatic passengers. Authorities in Seoul require all inbound passengers remaining in the city to undergo COVID-19 tests upon arrival. Officials will screen travelers with COVID-19 symptoms immediately and transport other passengers from Incheon International Airport (ICN) to designated testing facilities in Seoul. A 14-day self-quarantine requirement remains in place for all international travelers, regardless of testing outcomes. Officials will quarantine foreigners who do not have a residence in South Korea at government facilities at the traveler's expense.

South Africa: 

Regional and international flights remain suspended. Starting March 18, visas were denied to foreign travelers who have visited high-risk countries. Land border crossings are closed. All passengers are required to complete a health questionnaire and present it to Port Health upon arrival

Spain:

Spain has been gradually recovering from the COVID-19 pandemic. Internal movement restrictions were lifted June 21; residents are now permitted to travel between the country's different provinces. Authorities previously reopened the country's borders to travelers from most EU and Schengen Area countries June 21. The land border with Portugal was reopened July 1. Spain also allows entry for citizens of 13 non-EU countries deemed epidemiologically safe by the European Council. All travelers allowed to enter will not be required to self-isolate upon arrival. Authorities have introduced a mandatory Sanitary Control Form that all travelers arriving in the country by air must complete. After filling out the form, travelers will receive a unique QR code that they will have to show on arrival at the airport.

Sri Lanka:
As of Oct. 19, Sri Lankan authorities are mandating reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) tests within 72 hours before departure for all outbound passengers. Officials are also imposing indefinite curfews across high-risk areas with new local cases of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Affected areas include parts of Gampaha, Kalutara, Kegalle, and Kurunegala districts.

Sri Lankan authorities have indefinitely suspended the issuance of all visa types - including electronic, landing, multiple-entry, and residential - to foreigners regardless of nationality previously issued visas for foreign nationals, including residential permits, stand temporarily suspended. Such travelers will not be allowed to enter Sri Lanka. The restrictions do not apply to holders of diplomatic, official, and service passports. Diplomatic personnel permitted to enter Sri Lanka must submit a COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test result taken within 72 hours of departure, or undergo a PCR test upon arrival. Foreigners who are already in Sri Lanka may apply to extend the validity of their visas. Officials are indefinitely deferring earlier plans to allow entry to foreigners from Aug. 1, due to new local COVID-19 cases.

Officials have also suspended all inbound international passenger flights indefinitely; however, cargo transport, passenger transit, and international departures will continue at the Bandaranaike International Airport (CMB). Officials had previously halted all international services at the Jaffna International Airport (JAF) - Sri Lanka's only other functional international airport.

Sweden:

Authorities in Sweden are maintaining international entry restrictions as of July 31 as part of the country's efforts to combat the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Most individuals who are not citizens or residents of the the European Economic Area are prohibited from entry through at least Oct. 31. In line with EU recommendations, authorities are also permitting entry to travelers from Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, and Uruguay. Exceptions to the ban will also be made for students, healthcare workers, frontier workers, diplomats, freight workers, transiting passengers, and people who have urgent family matters. The Swedish Ministry of Foreign Affairs advises against all nonessential travel to countries outside the EU and EEA until Oct. 31.

Switzerland:

Officials in Switzerland tighten domestic COVID-19 measures from Oct. 19; International entry restrictions remain in effect. In most circumstances, only citizens and residents of EEA countries, as well as of Australia, Canada, Georgia, Japan, New Zealand, Rwanda, South Korea, Thailand, Tunisia, Uruguay, and the UK, are permitted to enter the country. Officials are also maintaining a travel advisory list of high-risk locations, which they update in accordance with local COVID-19 activity. Travelers arriving from any of the listed locations must self-quarantine for 10 days upon arrival. This measure does not apply to transit travelers who have spent fewer than 24 hours in a high-risk country or territory. Travelers will not be allowed to shorten their self-quarantine if they receive a negative COVID-19 test result during the 10-day period. The list includes the following countries and regions:

Austria ( Federal State of Vienna, Lower Austria, Upper Austria, Burgenland, Salzburg) Albania, Andorra, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, The Bahamas, Bahrain, Belgium, British Virgin Islands Belize, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Canada, Cape Verde, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Croatia, Czech Republic, Dominican Republic, Denmark, Ecuador, France (Bretagne, Centre-Val de Loire, Corse, Hauts-de-France, Ile de France, Normandie, Nouvelle-Aquitaine, Occitanie, Pays de la Loire, and Provence-Alpes-Cote d'Azur, French Guyana, Guadeloupe, French Polynesia, Reunion, Martinique, Mayotte, Saint-Barthelemy, and Saint-Martin), Georgia, Germany (Berlin and Hamburg), Gibraltar, Guyana, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, India, Iraq, Ireland, Italy (Campania, Liguria, Sardinia, Venetia) Iran, Israel, Jamaica, Jordan, Kosovo, Kuwait, Lebanon, Luxembourg Libya, Maldives, Malta, Moldova, Morocco, Montenegro, Namibia, Nepal, Netherlands, North Macedonia, Oman, Palestinian Territories, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Portugal, Qatar, Romania, Russia, San Marino, Sint Maarten, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain (including the Canary Islands ), Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turks and Caicos Islands, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, UK, and the US (including Puerto Rico, the US Virgin Islands, and Guam) 

Taiwan: 

As of Oct. 21, officials in Taiwan continue to adjust restrictions on international travelers amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Officials are allowing essential, short-term business travel for specific activities for residents from countries on the Central Epidemic Command Center (CECC)'s low- and medium-risk location list. Travelers must remain in their home location for two weeks before departure and provide documentation from a local entity detailing the reason for the trip, a full travel itinerary, a disease prevention plan, and the results of a COVID-19 test. The CECC has removed Sri Lanka from both lists and downgraded Cambodia to its medium-risk list due to reported COVID-19 activity in those locations. As of Oct. 20, the CECC classifies Bhutan, Brunei, Timor-Leste, Fiji, Laos, Macau, the Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mongolia, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Thailand, and Vietnam as low-risk and Australia, Cambodia, Hong Kong, and Singapore as medium-risk. Business travelers arriving from low-risk areas must quarantine for five days at government-designated facilities, while those traveling from medium-risk destinations must quarantine for seven days. All travelers must undergo a COVID-19 test at their own expense before their release from quarantine.

 

Inbound travel for tourism and social reasons remains banned; however, the following exceptions to the entry ban and quarantine requirements are in effect: 

Officials require all foreigners allowed into Taiwan to present a negative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) COVID-19 test obtained within three business days of their departing flight. Health officials continue intensified screenings for arriving passengers, including blood samples from passengers who display or report respiratory symptoms or fever. Officials are conducting COVID-19 tests on all arriving passengers from the Philippines. Passengers bound for Taiwan who do not accurately report their travel and medical history could face fines of up to NTD 150,000 (USD 5,000).

Most arrivals must self-quarantine for 14 days, except low- and medium-risk countries and travelers from the Philippines. Taiwan continues to require all arriving passengers from the Philippines to quarantine for 14 days in government-designated facilities due to an increase in imported cases. Foreign nationals, except those with ARC or resident visas, arriving from the Philippines must pay for quarantine at TWD 1,500 (USD 51) per day. Authorities also require some inbound travelers from Southeast Asian countries to undergo a 14-day quarantine at government-designated hotels; officials will direct arriving passengers living with people with chronic illnesses, children below six years old, or adults above 65 years old to the facilities. All travelers must pay for a COVID-19 test before their release from quarantine.

Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport (TPE) is allowing people to transit. However, passengers must connect with the same airline through TPE and limit connections in Taiwan to eight hours. As of July 10, officials have cleared China Airlines (CI), EVA Air (BR), and Cathay Pacific (CX) to operate transit flights. However, connecting flights to or from mainland China remain banned. Taiwan is maintaining limits on flights to mainland China indefinitely. Under the measures, airlines are only allowed to fly to airports in Beijing (PEK), Shanghai (SHA, PVG), Xiamen (XMN), and Chengdu (CTU). CA and BR continue to cancel most flight services to mainland China. Taiwan continues to ban cruise ships from docking at ports on the island.

Thailand:

Thailand has resumed limited foreign tourists' entry and inbound tourist flights, using special tourist visas as of Oct. 21 amid ongoing restrictions to stem the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The travelers must adhere to several protocols, including testing negative for COVID-19 before the trip and upon arrival, committing to staying in Thailand for at least 30 days, quarantining at government-designated facilities for two weeks upon arrival, and downloading a contact tracing application. Cargo, emergency, and repatriation flights and government aircraft can continue operating. People who can enter Thailand will quarantine for 14 days at government-designated facilities upon arrival, with limited exemptions. Foreigners also have to comply with health protocols, such as getting a letter from the nearest Thai embassy, a health insurance policy, and a certificate that they do not carry COVID-19 and quarantining for two weeks at government-designated facilities upon arrival in Thailand. The government may allow resident diplomats and their family members to isolate at their residence for two weeks.

Authorities have extended short-term visas for foreigners already in Thailand through Oct. 31. Several land checkpoints are operational, though the government continues to ban foreigners from entering the country through border checkpoints.

Authorities in Thailand are allowing additional categories of foreigners to enter the country from Aug. 4, amid attempts to stem the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The group includes permanent residents and work permit holders with their spouses and children; foreigners with special arrangements, such as the Thailand Elite Card, a program for frequent business visitors; and migrant workers whose employers have obtained approval for employees' entry. These foreigners will have to adhere to health protocols, such as two weeks of quarantine at designated facilities. Other groups of foreigners, including spouses, parents, and children of Thai citizens, resident diplomats, people seeking medical treatment, students of Thai educational institutions, and transport workers, can continue to enter. Domestic flights can operate with full passenger capacity as long as safeguards, such as requiring passengers to wear protective face coverings, are in place. Public transport has resumed with 70 percent of passenger capacity and other precautions.

Most inbound international flights remain banned. Exemptions are in place for cargo, emergency, and repatriation flights and government aircraft. People who can still enter Thailand will undergo a 14-day quarantine at government-designated facilities upon arrival, with limited exemptions. The government may allow resident diplomats and their family members to isolate at their residence for two weeks. Arriving foreigners also have to comply with additional health protocols, such as obtaining a letter from the nearest Thai embassy, a health insurance policy, and a certificate that they do not carry COVID-19. Authorities have reopened several land checkpoints, though officials continue to ban foreigners from entering the country through border checkpoints.

The central government also announced plans to allow entry for more groups of foreigners; it is unclear when this measure will come into effect. Authorities have additionally extended short-term visas for foreigners already in Thailand through Sept. 26; these foreigners will not be able to remain in the country past that date, with exemptions for people who are ill, among others.

Turkey:

International flights in Turkey will resume from June 18 after previously being suspended due to coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Initially, Turkish Airlines (TK) will fly to and from Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Netherlands, Denmark, and Sweden; it remains unclear when flights to other destinations will resume.

Domestic flights in Turkey have resumed from June 1 after previously being suspended due to coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The airlines resuming operations include Turkish Airlines (TK), Pegasus (PC), and SunExpress (XQ). Initially, flights will operate from Istanbul to Ankara, Izmir, Antalya, and Trabzon; flights to other cities are expected to gradually resume. Some international commercial passenger flights departing Turkey for major cities in Europe and the US are occurring on an ad hoc basis.

Authorities had already banned all passenger flights to and from China, Italy, Iran, Iraq, and South Korea, with the exception of flights carrying Iranian citizens to their home country. In addition, foreign citizens who have visited the above countries within the last 14 days are not permitted to enter Turkey, including for transit purposes; those with a residency permit will be permitted to enter Turkey but will be tested on arrival, which could result in quarantine or other mobility restriction.

UK:

Starting Oct. 17, authorities in England will classify London, most of Essex, York, northeast Derbyshire, Erewash, Chesterfield, Barrow-in-Furness, and Elmbridge as "high-risk" locations.

Effective 0400 Oct. 18, Italy, San Marino, and Vatican will be added to the UK quarantine list and travelers arriving from these countries must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival.

Authorities in England and Scotland have announced that international travelers from St. Eustatius and Saba, Poland, Turkey, and Bonaire will need to self-isolate for 14 days on arrival beginning 0400 Oct. 3 due to elevated coronavirus disease (COVID-19) activity in those countries.

Authorities in England have announced that international travelers from mainland Portugal, Hungary, French Polynesia, and Reunion will need to self-isolate for 14 days on arrival effective 0400 Sept. 12 due to elevated coronavirus disease (COVID-19) activity in these countries; the restriction does not apply to travelers arriving from the Portuguese islands of Madeira or the Azores. Additionally, as of the same time, travelers arriving from Sweden will no longer be required to self-isolate upon arrival.

Authorities in England have announced that international travelers from several Greek islands will need to self-isolate for 14 days on arrival effective 0400 Sept. 9 due to elevated coronavirus disease (COVID-19) activity in those areas. The islands are Crete, Lesbos, Mykonos, Santorini and Serifos; the requirement does not apply to arrivals from elsewhere in Greece.

Effective 0400 Aug. 29, authorities in the UK will require travelers from Czech Republic, Jamaica, and Switzerland to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival due to recent spikes in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) activity in those countries.

Effective 0400 Aug. 22, authorities in the UK will require travelers from Austria, Croatia, and Trinidad and Tobago to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival due to recent spikes in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) activity in those countries. At the same time, the self-isolation requirement will be lifted with regard to travelers arriving from Portugal. All international travelers entering the UK must still provide contact details and their travel history over the previous 14 days.

Authorities in the UK require travelers from France, Netherlands, Monaco, Turks & Caicos, and Aruba to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival, starting 0400 Aug. 15, due to spike in COVID-19 activity. All international travelers entering the UK must provide contact details and their travel history over the previous 14 days. Additionally, travelers arriving in the UK from Andorra, Belgium, and the Bahamas must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival; the same will apply for travelers arriving from these countries in England, Scotland, and Northern Ireland.

Authorities continue to exempt travelers from more than 70 countries and overseas territories - including Australia, Cuba, Germany, Italy, Malaysia, and New Zealand - from the requirement to self-isolate for 14 days upon entering the UK. International passengers of any nationality arriving by air, rail, or ferry from a nonexempt location to self-isolate for 14 days; health officials may perform spot checks to ensure compliance. Persons without suitable accommodations will be required to stay in facilities arranged by the government at their own expense. Freight drivers and healthcare workers are exempt from the requirement. Officials review the measures every three weeks.

Authorities in Wales and England have updated their countries' coronavirus (COVID-19)-related entry restrictions. As of 0001 Aug. 7, all travelers arriving in Wales from Andorra, Belgium, and the Bahamas will have to self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival; the same will apply for travelers arriving from these countries in England, Scotland, and Northern Ireland effective 0400 Aug. 8. This measure comes after an increase in COVID-19 infection rates in the targeted countries. In addition, travelers from Brunei and Malaysia will be able to enter UK without restrictions from 0400 Aug. 11 following a decrease in infection rates in those two countries.

On Friday 22 May, the UK Government announced that there will be new health measures in place for entering the UK because of coronavirus (COVID-19). These measures are for residents and visitors applicable from 8 June 2020.

When these measures are in place, those entering the UK will:

Need to provide their journey and contact details on an online form Click Here

Form must be completed before your customers arrive in the UK but not earlier than 48 hours before their arrival.

They’ll need to show their completed form when they arrive at the UK border, either by printing a copy, or showing it on their phone.

The UK Government announced that all customers arriving from mainland Spain, the Canaries and the Balearics from 26 July 2020 have to quarantine for 14 days. 

Effective 0001 July 26, authorities in England and Northern Ireland will reimpose a directive requiring all travelers arriving from Spain to self-quarantine for 14 days due to a recent spike in coronavirus disease (COVID-19) activity in that country. While the governments of Wales and Scotland have as yet made no official announcements on the matter, it is likely that they will implement similar measures over the coming days. Scotland had only placed Spain on its list of "exempted countries," thereby lifting its earlier requirement that travelers arriving from there self-isolate, as of July 23.

International arrivals of any nationality arriving from nonexempt locations are required to self-isolate for 14 days; health officials may perform spot checks to ensure compliance. Persons without suitable accommodation will be required to stay in facilities arranged by the government at their own expense. The measures apply to arrival by air, rail, and ferry. Freight drivers and healthcare workers are exempt from the requirement. Authorities in Scotland plan to lift quarantine requirements for travelers from Estonia, Latvia, Slovenia, Slovakia, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines as of July 28 following a decrease in COVID-19 activity in those countries.

United Arab Emirates:

Persons traveling from Dubai in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to the UK are no longer required to provide a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test prior to departure as of Oct. 6. However, travelers from the UAE to countries that do require a negative PCR test before arrival must obtain the test result within 96 hours before leaving the country.

Authorities clarified quarantine restrictions for international travelers arriving into Abu Dhabi Emirate, late Sept. 17. All travelers into the UAE via international flights are required to quarantine for 14 days and must wear an electronic tracking bracelet. If international travelers arrive in one of the UAE's other emirates but plan to go to Abu Dhabi, the 14-day quarantine requirement still applies. Time spent in another emirate prior to entering Abu Dhabi will be deducted from the 14-day quarantine requirement. Those arriving in Abu Dhabi whose final destination is another emirate are required to obtain a negative Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) test taken within 96 hours before departure. Travelers may leave Abu Dhabi during their quarantine period to visit another emirate; however, if they wish to return, they must follow entry guidelines. Travelers must take a PCR test on the 12th day of their quarantine. Other measures in effect in the UAE are included below:

• Since Aug. 12, residents of the UAE no longer require approval from the Federal Authority for Identity and Citizenship (ICA) to return to the country. The ICA will automatically grant pre-approval for expatriate residents wishing to return without the need to apply for an entry permit. Residents are advised to provide their passport number, Emirates ID number, and personal data. In the past, regulations announced regarding the UAE have not always been applied to Dubai Emirate. Authorities have yet to clarify if this is the case.
• All inbound and transit passengers traveling to the UAE must have a negative COVID-19 test certificate. The test must be taken a maximum of 96 hours before departure and from any government-approved lab. This excludes children under the age of 12 and passengers who have a moderate or severe disability. On Aug. 4, authorities expanded a list of approved facilities providing COVID-19 test results for travelers. Previously, travelers were required to take a test from facilities recognized only by the Emirati government.
• People entering Abu Dhabi from the Dubai border will either need a negative PCR result, taken within the previous 48 hours, or a negative Diffractive Phase Interferometry (DPI) test result within the last 48 hours, accompanied by a PCR test result, which must have been received within the last six days.
• All inbound passengers will undergo another COVID-19 test upon arrival in Abu Dhabi. Some flights from Abu Dhabi require a COVID-19 test result before departure. Regular inbound flights for tourists and visitors are not yet occurring.
• International tourists have been permitted into Dubai since July 7. Arrivals have to download the "COVID-19 DXB" app. All travelers to Dubai, including passengers with a connecting flight, must complete a health declaration form.
• All residents are required to wear protective facemasks in public and maintain adequate social distancing. As of Sept. 18, social gatherings must not exceed 10 family members.
• Stringent precautionary measures will continue to be enforced in public areas and facilities across Abu Dhabi and Dubai based on guidelines issued by local and federal authorities.
• Work permits were suspended effective March 19, except for internal transportation permits and employment permits for Expo 2020.

US:

US authorities extended the existing closure of the nation's land borders with Canada and Mexico to all nonessential travel through at least Nov 21. As part of their efforts to curb the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). The closures, which initially entered into force March 21, do not affect trade, movement of essential goods and workers, transport of food or medicines, or transit by cargo trucks. US citizens and legal residents returning to the country, as well as individuals traveling to attend educational institutions, are exempt.

Other restrictions remain in place. US authorities continue to ban entry by most nonresident foreign nationals who have been in Brazil, China (excluding Hong Kong and Macau), Iran, UK, Ireland, and the European Schengen Area within the previous 14 days. US citizens and legal residents who have traveled to a country on the restricted list within 14 days prior to their return are allowed to enter but are urged to limit contact with people from outside of their households upon arrival in the US.

Since Oct. 1, US authorities have added exceptions for nonresident foreign nationals entering from the Schengen Area, UK, or Ireland to enter the US. Business travelers, investors, academics, and journalists, among others, may qualify for a national interest exception, but must contact US diplomatic offices in order to apply.

The government in Washington continues to advise US residents to avoid nonessential travel to most countries in the world due to COVID-19 concerns. As of Oct. 19, US authorities consider only 33 countries and territories worldwide to have moderate, low, or very low-risk of COVID-19, including New Zealand, Thailand, Cambodia, Mongolia, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Laos, New Caledonia, Taiwan, and Vietnam; there are no governmental advisories against travel to designated moderate, low, or very low-risk destinations, except for persons having special risk factors. Travelers returning from all other locations are urged to remain at home as much as possible, wear protective face masks, and practice social distancing.

Vietnam: 

Authorities have allowed the resumption of international flights with Guangzhou, Seoul, Taiwan, and Tokyo from Sept. 15. Flights with Cambodia and Laos will restart from Sept. 22. However, the entry ban for most foreigners remains in place, with exceptions for foreign experts, investors, managers, skilled workers, and resident diplomats; foreign tourists remain barred from boarding inbound flights and visiting Vietnam. Permitted inbound passengers must test negative for COVID-19 up to five days before the travel date, quarantine at designated facilities for at least five days, and test for COVID-19 twice at the isolation sites, with limited exemptions. With exceptions for diplomats, arrivals have to pay for quarantine costs. Foreign experts, business managers, investors, and diplomats who are visiting Vietnam for less than 14 days are exempt from isolation requirements, though they still have to comply with other health protocols. Safeguards include testing for COVID-19 before departure and upon arrival, frequently sanitizing their hands, and adhering to contact tracing measures.

Authorities continue to adjust measures as of Sept. 1 to stem the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Officials announced Aug. 30 that arrivals have to pay for isolation costs starting from Sept. 1; people who can enter Vietnam must quarantine for 14 days at government-run facilities. Authorities have also approved visa extensions through Sept. 30 for foreigners already in Vietnam.

Officials continue to bar entry for foreign nationals, with exemptions for essential and skilled workers and diplomats, among others. People who can enter Vietnam must test negative for COVID-19 before traveling and undergo a 14-day quarantine at government-run facilities at their own costs upon arrival, with exceptions; the government announced that arriving diplomats are exempt from having to pay for quarantine expenses. Authorities stated, June 24, that Vietnam was not ready to admit foreign tourists back into the country, even though officials started to issue electronic visas to foreign nationals from 80 locations July 1. These locations include Australia, mainland China, India, Japan, New Zealand, the Philippines, South Korea, the UK, and the US. Officials have approved visa extensions through Sept. 30 for foreigners already in Vietnam. Flights to Vietnam remain operational, though only Vietnamese citizens and limited groups of foreigners can board.

 (2) AIRLINE UPDATES

Several flight operators have announced temporary suspension or the reduction of flights on routes serving China amid travel restrictions imposed in the country to contain the Coronavirus(COVID-19)  outbreak. Further short-notice flight cancellations or adjustments in schedules can be expected in the coming days.

Flights Suspension or cancellation from/to China

that have not lapsed the quarantine period of 14 days out of the Country at risk (P.R.C.);

that do present any signs or symptoms of disease after the quarantine period of 14 days;

Flights Cancellations from/to Hong Kong

(3) SPECIAL TICKETING GUIDELINE FROM AIRLINES FOR CHINA

Most airlines have extended goodwill policy to allow full ticket refunds or to change flights free of charge through the end of February. For more details, please contact your designated travel consultant.

(4) USEFUL LINKS

Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA): Click here

World Health Organizations (WHO): Click here

Centres of Disease Control (CDC): Click here

HKSAR Security Bureau: Click here

International SOS: Click here

Cathay Pacific/Cathay Dragon: Click here for latest updates regarding travel restrictions

Taoyuan International Airport: Click here

Taipei Songshan Airport: Click here

Kaohsiung International Airport: Click here

Taiwan Centers for Disease Control: Click here

Shanghai Airport Authority: Click here

Beijing Capital International Airport: Click here

Beijing Daxing Airport: Click here

National Health Commission of the People's Republic of China: Click